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Launching a Successful Discourse Community

Jeff Atwood August 6, 2018

While we’ve offered general tips for building a Discourse community, we also get a lot of questions about what specifically you can do to help launch a successful Discourse community.

What is the “elevator pitch” for your community?

The very first thing people will ask — what is this place? How would you describe your community to someone you just met in a 60 second elevator ride? Make sure that’s visible on your home page, as a banner or pinned topic.

Build some interesting discussions to launch with

group of people working

  • What comes up often in your internal emails? Are there common themes that tend to come up again and again with your fans, customers, users, patrons, teammates, coworkers, subscribers? Try moving those discussions out of private email silos into your public (or private) discussion area.

  • If you find an interesting article on the web you want to discuss, quickly start a new topic by pasting a link into the topic title. Try it!

  • Have some open-ended getting to know you topics for people to share their opinions, experiences, stories, or pictures. An “introduce yourself” topic is always fun, and you should go first!

  • Where have you seen interesting, thoughtful discussions recently? Can you bring the spirit of those discussions to your site? Imagine what a model user you would love to see on your site would do – and then try doing that yourself. Invite friends or coworkers to post example topics and reply to them so visitors can browse the existing conversations to discover what your community is about.

Get the right people in the room

social media notifications

  • Send personal invitations to your staff, power users, or friends, to log in early and reply to your initial topics to generate activity. Send one-click email invites via your Discourse invite page (it’s on your user profile page). You can also send bulk invites to many email addresses at once.

  • Generously like any and every post you enjoy! What type of content gets liked is a major part of your community’s culture. Set an example by frequently liking posts in the early days of your forum. Seeing liked posts also encourages people to reciprocate in kind, and come back for more.

  • Actively seek the help of power users and early adopters in your community. There’s a built in feedback category titled “site feedback” for discussing organization and governance. Let your most avid users have a say in what your community does, how the site works, and what your community becomes.

How do people find your community?

navigation diagram and arrows

  • Where can you place links to your community so that people (and web search engines) will naturally discover it? In the header or footer of your website? Where else?

  • Promote your community. Add a note to your mailing lists or email newsletters, put up a notice on your website, or make a blog entry about your new community. Consider running a contest of some kind.

  • What rewards, perks, contests, or incentives can you give people for signing up, for posting, for replying? Check your user directory at /users to see engagement statistics, and shower your best users with attention to encourage them.

For additional advice, see our blog post on how to build engaging Discourse communities.

Good luck! And don’t forget the most important ingredient of all — time. Building a community takes patience and persistence. Plan to stick around for weeks, months, even years!

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Understanding Discourse Trust Levels

Jeff Atwood June 25, 2018

The user trust system is a fundamental cornerstone of Discourse. Trust levels are a way of…

  • Sandboxing new users in your community so that they cannot accidentally hurt themselves, or other users while they are learning what to do.
  • Granting experienced users more rights over time, so that they can help everyone maintain and moderate the community they generously contribute so much of their time to.

As documented in Community Building on the Web, there is a natural progression for participants in any community.

This seemed like a great starting point for our user trust system. Thus, Discourse offers five user trust levels. Your current trust level is visible on your user page, and a summary of all trust levels within your community is presented on your dashboard.

Discourse trust level counts

Trust Level 0 — New

By default, all new users start out at trust level 0, meaning trust has yet to be earned. These are visitors who just created an account, and are still learning the community norms and the way your community works. New users’ abilities are restricted for safety – both theirs and yours.

(We also want to hide any “advanced” functionality from new users to make the UI less confusing for them as they gain more experience.)

Users at trust level 0 cannot

  • Send personal messages to other users
  • “Reply as new topic” via Link button (UI removed)
  • Flag posts
  • Post more than 1 image
  • Post any attachments
  • Post more than 2 hyperlinks in a post
  • Have actual links in the ‘about me’ field of their profile (will be silently and temporarily converted to plain text)
  • Mention more than 2 users in a post
  • Post more than 3 topics
  • Post more than 10 replies

Admins can change these limitations by searching for newuser and first_day in site settings.

Trust Level 1 — Basic

At Discourse, we believe reading is the most fundamental and healthy action in any community. If a new user is willing to spend a little time reading, they will quickly be promoted to the first trust level.

Get to trust level 1 by…

  • entering at least 5 topics
  • reading at least 30 posts
  • spend a total of 10 minutes reading posts

Users at trust level 1 can…

  • use all core Discourse functions; all new user restrictions are removed
  • Send PMs
  • Upload images and attachments if enabled
  • Edit wiki posts
  • Flag posts

Admins can change these thresholds by searching for tl1 in site settings.

Trust Level 2 — Member

Members keep coming back to your community over a series of weeks; they have not only read, but actively participated long and consistently enough to be trusted with full citizenship.

Get to trust level 2 by…

  • visiting at least 15 days, not sequentially
  • casting at least 1 like
  • receiving at least 1 like
  • replying to at least 3 different topics
  • entering at least 20 topics
  • reading at least 100 posts
  • spend a total of 60 minutes reading posts

Users at trust level 2 can…

  • Use the “Invite others to this topic” button for one-click onboarding of new users to participate in topics
  • Invite outside users to PMs making a group PM
  • Daily like limit increased by 1.5×

Admins can change these thresholds by searching for tl2 in site settings.

Trust Level 3 — Regular

Regulars are the backbone of your community, the most active readers and reliable contributors over a period of months, even years. Because they’re always around, they can be further trusted to help tidy up and organize the community.

To get to trust level 3, in the last 100 days…

  • must have visited at least 50% of days
  • must have replied to at least 10 different topics
  • of topics created in the last 100 days, must have viewed 25% (capped at 500)
  • of posts created in the last 100 days, must have read 25% (capped at 20k)
  • must have received 20 likes, and given 30 likes.*
  • must not have received more than 5 spam or offensive flags (with unique posts and unique users for each, confirmed by a moderator)
  • must not have been suspended

* These likes must be across a minimum number of different users (1/5 the number), across a minimum number of different days (1/4 the number). Likes cannot be from PMs.

All of the above criteria must be true to achieve trust level 3. Furthermore, unlike other trust levels, you can lose trust level 3 status. If you dip below these requirements in the last 100 days, you will be demoted back to Member. However, in order to avoid constant promotion/demotion situations, there is a 2-week grace period immediately after gaining Trust Level 3 during which you will not be demoted.

Users at trust level 3 can…

  • recategorize and rename topics
  • access a secure category only visible to users at trust level 3 and higher
  • have all their links followed (we remove automatic nofollow)
  • TL3 spam flags cast on TL0 user posts immediately hide the post
  • TL3 flags cast on TL0 user posts in sufficient diversity will auto-silence the user and hide all their posts
  • make their own posts wiki (that is, editable by any TL1+ users)
  • Daily like limit increased by 2×

Admins can change these thresholds by searching for TL3 in site settings.

Trust Level 4 — Leader

Leaders are regulars who have been around forever and seen everything. They set a positive example for the community through their actions and their posts. If you need advice, these are the folks you turn to first, and they’ve earned the highest level of community trust, such that they are almost moderators within the community already.

Get to trust level 4 by…

  • Manual promotion by staff only
  • (Possibly via a to-be-developed election system in the future)

Users at trust level 4 can…

  • edit all posts
  • pin/unpin topic
  • close topics
  • archive topics
  • make topics unlisted
  • Split and merge topics
  • Daily like limit increased by 3×

We believe this trust system has been a success so far, as it leads to stronger, more sustainable communities by carefully empowering members, regulars, and leaders to curate and lead their own communities. But like everything else in Discourse, the trust system is evolving over time as we gain more experience with more communities. We’ll continue to update this post with any changes.

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Discourse in Outreachy Summer 2018

Erlend Sogge Heggen March 13, 2018

tl;dr: Discourse will be participating in Outreachy Summer. If you are eligible to participate in this internship, please consider applying!

About Outreachy

Participants of Outreachy work with an open source organization (in our case Discourse) on a 3 month programming project. It’s similar to events like Google Summer of Code, however the aim of Outreachy is to provide a collaborative environment in which newcomers from underrepresented backgrounds get an opportunity to learn from and contribute to FOSS by doing paid, full-time work.

Participation is open internationally to all women (cis and trans), trans men, and genderqueer people. Additionally, it’s open to residents and nationals of the United States of any gender who are Black/African American, Hispanic/Latino, American Indian, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian, or Pacific Islander.

Source: https://www.outreachy.org/

Furthermore, unlike GSoC, Outreachy is open to all ages, not just students.

Background

We were planning to defer on Outreachy until this winter, seeing as our mentoring capacity is limited. However, since our application for GSoC got rejected we decided to participate in the Outreachy summer round after all! As a result of this sudden u-turn everything is happening at the last minute, but judging by our previous Outreachy interns we’re confident we’ll be hearing from some excellent candidates shortly.

How to apply

The main application is available at outreachy.org.

Outreachy requires applicants to have made a contribution to the project they’re applying to. Make sure you carefully read the “Recommended reading before applying” and “What you’ll be working on” sections.

The formal application deadline is March 22, 2018, but we’ll be extending it by one week, to March 29.

Any questions? Please contact team@discourse.org or ask questions on meta.discourse.org.

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